Four Styles of Intervention

The University of Arizona and the NCAA have developed a program that helps defeat the bystander effect.  It is called the Step Up! program. If you are interested in learning more about this organization, you can watch this video.

They have developed five styles of intervention, are represented by animals. However, in this blog post, I will discuss only four of these in more detail because the fifth one is rare. These animals are turtle, teddy bear, shark and fox. The Step Up! program developed and adapted these from the Janssen Sports Leadership Manual. After you are done reading this blog post, please take this PlayBuzz quiz I created to help you determine which animal you are. Also, engage with us by sharing your results by taking a poll at the end of this blog post.

 

1. Turtle (Low responsiveness, low assertiveness) 

A turtle is someone who may come off as being shy and serious.  Turtles typically assess a situation before they intervene in a situation. Some adjectives to describe them are stubborn, shy, serious, and sarcastic.

Typical traits include: 

  • Taking time to assess situations
  • Taking time to be neat and orderly
  • Not participating in situations
  • More goal oriented than people oriented
  • Collecting as much data as possible before intervening in order to be confident
  • Working slowly and preferring to do it alone
  • Looking for assurance and self-actualization
  • Excelling at problem solving

Are you an turtle? If you are, here are some things to consider to help you improve:

  • Question situations more
  • Keep walking
  • Talk to a friend about the situation
  • Wait a day to talk to the aggressor or bully
  • Talk to the victim
  • Join a group that will help you
  • Call for help
  • Talk to a school counselor

 

2. Teddy Bear (High responsiveness, low assertiveness) 

A Teddy Bear is someone who knows that a problem exists but is hesitant to act. They tend to enjoy being around people and tend to be more of a listener than a talker. People who identify with this style are open to what someone has to say, are dependable, and interact well with others.

Typical traits include:

  • Having difficulty making a decision and taking action
  • Disliking conflict between people and groups of people
  • Listening well to others and being supportive
  • Being comfortable in a group rather than alone
  • Excelling with counseling and listening skills

Are you a teddy bear? If you are, here are some things to consider to help you improve:

  • Give a questioning glance
  • Talk to others to get your ideas and perspectives
  • Keep walking
  • Talk to a friend about the situation
  • Wait a day to talk to the aggressor or bully
  • Talk to the victim
  • Join the group that is intervening
  • Offer alternative solutions
  • Interrupt and redirect
  • Talk to a school counselor

 

3. Shark (High responsiveness, High assertiveness)

Sharks are more task oriented than they are people oriented. People that identify with this style expect that people around them will have the same level of efficiency and effectiveness. The people who align themselves with this style tend to be more competitive, a go getter, efficient, stubborn, self-reliant and headstrong.

Typical traits include being: 

  • Decisive when taking action or making a decision
  • Likes the ability to handle others
  • Dislikes people that are slow to act
  • Not having a tolerance for other people’s feelings, attitudes or advice
  • Works diligently and well when alone
  • Seeking approval and respect from others
  • Excelling at administrative tasks

Are you a shark? If you are, here are some things to consider to help you improve and intervene:

  • Remove yourself from the problem
  • Confront the aggressor or bully
  • Express your concerns to the aggressor or bully
  • Show that you disapprove
  • Share your reaction
  • Say you are offended
  • Talk to the aggressor

 

4. Fox (High responsiveness, Low assertiveness)

A Fox enjoys being around people. People that identify with this style tend to be more outgoing and active in whatever is going on at the time, and tend to share their thoughts. People that align with this style tend to be passionate, at times theatrical, stubborn, outgoing, encouraging and lively.

Typical traits include being:

  • Uses spur-of-the-moment thinking when taking action or making decisions
  • Likes to participate in social situations
  • Exaggerating or generalizing
  • Energetic with work-related activities
  • Working well with others
  • Seeking respect from others
  • Excelling at persuasive skills

Are you are a fox? If you are, here are some things to consider to help you improve:

  • Report the incident
  • Call the police for assistance
  • Suggest the people in conflict to do something else
  • Show that you disapprove
  • Share your reaction
  • Say that you are offended
  • Talk to others to get their ideas and input
  • Offer to spend time with the victim and the aggressor
  • Offer alternative solutions for the victim and aggressor
  • Interrupt the aggressor and victim
  • Talk to your friends to figure out what you should do

 

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